ALÎ MUHAMMAD MORI
(Japanese)

Exactly eighteen years ago[1],([1] Sixty-eight years ago, as of today.) in 1929 that is, I was in Manchuria. Japan had reached one of the apices of its history.

During one of the journeys I took around Manchuria, I met a Muslim in a desert in the vicinity of Pieching. They were leading a very plain and pious life. I admire their life-styles, their trust in Allâhu ta’âlâ, the hospitality they showed to strangers, and their sense of faith. As I moved further inland in Manchuria, I met many other Muslims, observed the same pure and beautiful quality in all of them, and consequently began to feel growing sympathy for them. It was no earlier than 1946 that I managed to go back to Japan.

In the meantime, Japan had joined the Second World War, being on the losing side in the end. The one-time powerful Japanese Empire was all gone. Buddhism, to which most Japanese people had been so sincerely and so heartfully adherent until that time, had been entirely stripped of its original essence and its logical features, and was now a mere source of detriment to society.

A minor number of Japanese people had already been Christianized. Despite the ninety long years wherein Christianity had been forcing its spread in Japan, very few Japanese people had become Christians. Yet, by the time I arrived in Japan, I saw that their number had increased considerably. The Japanese people had realized, after the heavy defeat they had suffered, that Buddha would give them no help at times of disaster. Having thoroughly lost their love for and trust in Buddha, they were now looking for a new religion. The younger people, especially, had accepted Christianity with the expectations that it would be the best possible substitute for their lost faith. Yet it did not take them long to realize that the Christian missionaries who had been trying to Christianize them were in actual fact squalid mercenaries working for American and British capitalists and that by Christianizing them they would not only refill the vacuum vacated by the no longer wanted Buddhism, but also divest them of the deep-rooted purity and integrity that had so far been associated with their Japanese identity. During the process of Christianization, the Christian missionaries were continuously inculcating into their minds the superior qualities of American and British goods, which in turn gradually infused into them a growing feeling of aversion to their domestic goods, and which consequently resulted in an influx of foreign materials into Japan. In more concise terms, the capitalists were exploiting us to increase their wealth via Christianity.

Japan is a country lying between Russia and America. Each of these superpowers will normally try to bring Japan under its own sway. The inculcations they have been practising on us must therefore be intended for their own advantages, rather than guiding our souls to salvation. On the other hand, especially in those days, the Japanese people needed true tutorship.

As far as I am concerned, only the Islamic religion will satisfy this requirement, guiding them to spiritual peace and salvation, and showing them the truest way they should follow.

One merit that I admire best in Islam is the powerful feeling of brotherhood with which it equips Muslims. Islam emphasizes that Muslims are brothers beyond their cutaneous and racial identities, and Allâhu ta’âlâ commands the human race to live in brotherly peace and safety without fostering any feelings of harm towards one another.

Could another commandment more perfect and more true be conceived on the face of today’s miserable world? Who on earth could doubt that the great being who gives such a command should certainly be Allah Himself? Last year two Muslims came to Tokoshima. They were from Pakistan. I paid them a visit immediately. They gave me very beautiful and very profound information about Islam. Later I talked with some Japanese Muslims. Two of them, Mr. Molivala and Mr. Mita of Tokyo, enlightened me and recommended that I should convert to Islam. Upon this I embraced Islam.

I wish with all my heart that Islam, the most logical and the purest religion, should spread all over the world and rescue humanity from this disastrous situation. If the entire humanity become Muslims, this miserable world will become a Garden of Paradise. Then, the Grace and Grandeur of Allâhu ta’âlâ will illuminate the human souls and guide them on the right way, which will lead them to eternal salvation. Only through Islam will humankind attain happiness, both spiritually and physically, and be blessed with the divine favour of being beloved born slaves of Allâhu ta’âlâ.

LEAVE A REPLY